1903: John Philip Sousa and His Band Perform at North Baltimore’s Henry Opera House

John Philip Sousa band

The following article appeared in the September 11, 1903 issue of The North Baltimore Beacon in the Home Notes Section:

Sousa is back from a record breaking trip in Europe where he achieved success that has never been equaled by any other conductor and established himself among the first of the popular musicians of the world. Within the comparatively limited space of 8 months the great American band was heard in no less than 362 concerts in 133 different cities in 13 different countries.

Among the countries that Sousa played for the first time this year were Russia, Austria, Denmark, Poland, Bohemia, Ireland, and Wales. He is about to inaugurate a limited American tour, his twenty-third semi-annual trip of the kind and will soon be heard in concert here at Henry’s Opera House on September 22 in the afternoon. The supporting soloists with the band this year are Miss Estella Lierbling, soprano, who has won international reputation and popularity with Sousa, and Miss Anna Otten, a violiniste of superior excellence.

In the September 9, 1911 fire picture above, Henry’s Opera House is the second building from the left. The Henry Opera House where Sousa performed in 1903 was the third of three buildings built by Dr. A.G. Henry, a leading North Baltimore businessman and physician during the 1880s and 90s. The first and second opera buildings burned to the ground in 1888 and 1894 respectively. When the 1911 fire destroyed the third building, it was not rebuilt. The photograph was taken looking west from the intersection of North Main St. and East Broadway.

Opera House after fire

In the September 9, 1911 fire picture above, Henry’s Opera House is the second building from the left. The Henry Opera House where Sousa performed in 1903 was the third of three buildings built by Dr. A.G. Henry, a leading North Baltimore businessman and physician during the 1880s and 90s. The first and second opera buildings burned to the ground in 1888 and 1894 respectively. When the 1911 fire destroyed the third building, it was not rebuilt. The photograph was taken looking west from the intersection of North Main St. and East Broadway.

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